Ockapus Dreams

RSS

Bastards Fandom Visits Lucien's Library...

  • Shivertongue: Arii
  • Shivertongue: I just had this dream
  • Shivertongue: I was checking in books, like normal.
  • Shivertongue: I grabbed the next one on the pile
  • Ariaste: uh huh
  • Shivertongue: And it was Thorn of Emberlain.
  • Shivertongue: And I stared, because it wasn't supposed to be out yet
  • Ariaste: *choke*
  • Shivertongue: But, I did what anyone would do in that situation.
  • Ariaste: Chewed up some orange peel, feigned sickness, and got sent home?
  • Shivertongue: Clutched it to my chest and ran off cackling like a madman.
  • Shivertongue: Only
  • Ariaste: sure that's good too
  • Shivertongue: When I sat down with it.
  • Shivertongue: And opened it up
  • Ariaste: was it blank
  • Shivertongue: It was in Icelandic.
  • Ariaste: FUCK
  • ---
  • AH HA HA. Ah. Shit. I was hoping to sort of keep this secret a while longer, but THORN will only be released in Icelandic. So you'd all better start practicing.
  • Hey, I can mock this pain because I've had these dreams.
  • I've had these dreams about books I'd supposedly written.

orangemagpie:

annakie:

Sleepy Hollow Cast (x)

Eeeeeee!

nativenews:

Natives decolonize diet to fight diabetes, reconnect to land
[PHOTO: Rebecca Yoshino, director of the Shakopee Mdewakanton’s gardens, holds Dakota Corn in her hands Aug. 19, 2014 in Shakopee, Minn. American Indians are tackling obesity and diabetes by embracing ancient foods. Kyndell Harkness/Minneapolis Star Tribune/MCT.]
Bit by bit, the farm at Little Earth of United Tribes is growing. So, too, is a movement among Native Americans across the nation to improve their health by rediscovering ancestral foods and connections to lands once lost.
“It’s growing in the last 10 years within the Native communities in the United States,” said Susen Fagrelius, coordinator of Little Earth’s community health initiatives. As more people realize they can grow a significant amount of vegetables on a small parcel of land, they discover that “they have the ability to take back their food system.”
Lakota sage appears where once ordinary grass grew. Rows of Oneida cornstalks tower 6 feet in the air. Raspberries cover a small patch of the farm.
When Indians were forced onto reservations, government commodities replaced the unprocessed, nutrient-rich foods they were used to eating, said Mihesuah, a member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma who runs the American Indian Health and Diet Project at the University of Kansas.
“Type 2 diabetes didn’t start showing up until after the Civil War,” she said. Through food, she wanted to “help our community and other native communities address acute and chronic conditions.”
The decolonized diet movement is spreading seeds nationwide. In New Mexico, indigenous food programs are working to preserve seeds from hundreds of years ago. Tribes in North Carolina are restoring native fruit and vegetable plants in newly established gardens.
The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community is at the forefront of these efforts. Lori Watso, a former public health nurse and Shakopee Tribe member, was the inspiration for the expansive garden and natural health store established on tribal land in Prior Lake, Minnesota.
Since starting in 2010, the garden has more than doubled in size.
Now in its fifth growing season, the 12-acre Wozupi has an orchard with trees bearing indigenous fruits – June berries, elderberries and wild plums. Goats and chickens roam the newly added Children’s Garden. There’s also a Heritage Garden, where ancient seeds given to them from other tribes grow.

nativenews:

Natives decolonize diet to fight diabetes, reconnect to land

[PHOTO: Rebecca Yoshino, director of the Shakopee Mdewakanton’s gardens, holds Dakota Corn in her hands Aug. 19, 2014 in Shakopee, Minn. American Indians are tackling obesity and diabetes by embracing ancient foods. Kyndell Harkness/Minneapolis Star Tribune/MCT.]

Bit by bit, the farm at Little Earth of United Tribes is growing. So, too, is a movement among Native Americans across the nation to improve their health by rediscovering ancestral foods and connections to lands once lost.

“It’s growing in the last 10 years within the Native communities in the United States,” said Susen Fagrelius, coordinator of Little Earth’s community health initiatives. As more people realize they can grow a significant amount of vegetables on a small parcel of land, they discover that “they have the ability to take back their food system.”

Lakota sage appears where once ordinary grass grew. Rows of Oneida cornstalks tower 6 feet in the air. Raspberries cover a small patch of the farm.

When Indians were forced onto reservations, government commodities replaced the unprocessed, nutrient-rich foods they were used to eating, said Mihesuah, a member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma who runs the American Indian Health and Diet Project at the University of Kansas.

“Type 2 diabetes didn’t start showing up until after the Civil War,” she said. Through food, she wanted to “help our community and other native communities address acute and chronic conditions.”

The decolonized diet movement is spreading seeds nationwide. In New Mexico, indigenous food programs are working to preserve seeds from hundreds of years ago. Tribes in North Carolina are restoring native fruit and vegetable plants in newly established gardens.

The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community is at the forefront of these efforts. Lori Watso, a former public health nurse and Shakopee Tribe member, was the inspiration for the expansive garden and natural health store established on tribal land in Prior Lake, Minnesota.

Since starting in 2010, the garden has more than doubled in size.

Now in its fifth growing season, the 12-acre Wozupi has an orchard with trees bearing indigenous fruits – June berries, elderberries and wild plums. Goats and chickens roam the newly added Children’s Garden. There’s also a Heritage Garden, where ancient seeds given to them from other tribes grow.

katieelle:

MOTHERFLIPPIN’ CARDCAPTOR SAKURA
formative influences tbqh
I love her final huge staff 

katieelle:

MOTHERFLIPPIN’ CARDCAPTOR SAKURA

formative influences tbqh

I love her final huge staff 

ewatsondaily:

"I decided that I was a feminist. This seemed uncomplicated to me. But my recent research has shown me that feminism has become an unpopular word. Women are choosing not to identify as feminists. Apparently, [women’s expression is] seen as too strong, too aggressive, anti-men, unattractive."

ewatsondaily:

"I decided that I was a feminist. This seemed uncomplicated to me. But my recent research has shown me that feminism has become an unpopular word. Women are choosing not to identify as feminists. Apparently, [women’s expression is] seen as too strong, too aggressive, anti-men, unattractive."

thehippiejew:

forsayingyes:

gqgqqt:

so this is a thing

a bunch of moms are making letters+audio recordings of affirming, validating letters to queer/trans* people who don’t get that kind of support from their moms

i would say more about it but

im kind of busy in this puddle of tears on the floor so

In case any of my followers don’t have this kind of support from home…

my mom did this and if you need an honourary mother i promise she would be happy to talk to you

thatsqualitystuff:

Prisoner zero has escaped

thatsqualitystuff:

Prisoner zero has escaped

(Source: awwww-cute)

potofsoup:

scrollgirl:

primarybufferpanel:

To hell with dignity. I’ll leave when the job’s done.

[Agent Carter]

I literally just went “Oh. Oh! OHHHHHH!”

#mcu #peggy carter #Nick Fury #director of SHIELD #she mentored him

I’ve long hoped for a very young Nick Fury to begin guest-starring in Season 4 of Agent Carter. I desperately want a long, increasingly complicated story-arc of Peggy taking Nick under her wing and mentoring him and training him up to be the next Director of SHIELD, fraught with politics and issues of race and gender, and friendship and trust and heroism.

Wow, I want this more than I want Peggy and Howard starting SHIELD.

I want this as much as I want a Pacific Rim prequel that’s mostly Mako and Stacker Pentecost.

weasleywrinkles:

kittykat1087:

imsirius:

Mark Williams and Julie Walters behind the scenes of Bill&Fleur’s wedding

This should have just been put in the movie, as mr and mrs weasley probably dance just like this.

THIS IS GOLD

I get criticized for taking roles in films like ‘Ghost Rider 2’, but if you look at my resume, dude, I’ve mixed it up as much as I can.

(Source: jamiedblackley)